Filmmaker, Video Editor, Motion Graphics Designer, and Photographer in Cairo, Egypt.
Keeping notes to remember.. You may consider it some sort of Documentation.

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Monday, December 30, 2013

Saturday, December 21, 2013

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Built to Last (6): Big Hairy Audacious Goals


Had read "Built to Last" since a while; and realized that it's not just about building a company that would last for couple decades, but also it's about building a "Personality" & a "Nation" that could last for decades as well.

So, I thought I should keep some notes/excerpts...

Part 1: The Best of The Best
Part 2: Clock Building, Not Time Telling
Part 3: No "Tyranny of The OR" (Embrace The "Genius of The AND")
Part 4: More Than Profits
Part 5: Preserve The Core / Stimulate Progress

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"Far better to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than to take rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in the gray twilight that knows not victory, nor defeat." - Theodore Roosevelt, 1899

All companies have goals. But there is a difference between merely having a goal and becoming committed to a huge, daunting challenge - like a big mountain to climb.

Like a moon mission, a true Big Hairy Audacious Goals (BHAG) is clear and compelling and serves as a unifying focal point of effirts - often creating immense team spirit. It has a clear finish line, so the organization can know when it has achieved the goal; people like to shoot for finish lines.

A BHAG engages people - it reaches out and grabs them in the gut. It is tangible, energizing, highly focused. People "get it" right away; it takes little or no explanation.

It's not just the presence of a goal that stimulate progress,  it is also the level of commitment to the goal. Indeed, a goal cannot be classified as a BHAG without a high level of commitment to the goal.

Here are a few key take-away points you might want to keep in mind as you consider BHAGs for your own organization:
  • A BHAG should be so clear and compelling that it requires little or no explanation. Remember, a BHAG is a goal - like climbing a mountain or going to moon - not a "statement."  If it doesn't get people's juices going, then it's not a BHAG.
  • A BHAG should fall well outside the comfort zone. People in the organization should have reason to believe they can pull it off, yet it should require heroic effort and perhaps even a little luck.
  • A BHAG should be so bold and exciting in its own right that it would continue to stimulate progress even if the organization's leaders disappeared before it had been completed.
  • A BHAG has the inherent danger that, once achieved, an organization can stall and drift in the "we've arrived" syndrome. A company should be prepared to prevent this by having follow-on BHAGs. 
  • Finally, and most important at all, a BHAG should be consistent with a company's core ideology. 
 BHAGs alone do not make a visionary company. Indeed, progress alone - no matter  what the mechanism used to stimulate progress - doesn't make a visionary company. A company should be careful to preserve its core while pursuing BHAGs

Monday, October 14, 2013

Built to Last (5): Preserve The Core / Stimulate Progress


Had read "Built to Last" since a while; and realized that it's not just about building a company that would last for couple decades, but also it's about building a "Personality" & a "Nation" that could last for decades as well.

So, I thought I should keep some notes/excerpts...

Part 1: The Best of The Best
Part 2: Clock Building, Not Time Telling
Part 3: No "Tyranny of The OR" (Embrace The "Genius of The AND")

------------------------

We've found that companies get into trouble by confusing core ideology with specific, noncore practices. By confusing core ideology with noncore practices, companies can cling too long to noncore items - things that should be changed in order for the company to adapt and move forward. This brings us to a crucial point: A visionary company carefully preserves and protects its core ideology, yet all the specific manifestations of its core ideology must be open for change and evolution.


Drive For Progress:
Core ideology in a visionary company works hand in hand with a relentless drive for progress that impels change and forward movement in all that is not part of the core ideology. The drive for progress arises from a deep human urge - to explore, to create, to discover, to achieve, to change, to  improve. The drive for progress isn't a sterile, intellectual recognition that "progress is healthy in changing world" or that "healthy organizations should change and improve" or that "we should have goals"; rather, it's a deep, inner, compulsive - almost primal - drive.

Like a persistent and incurable itch, the drive for progress in a highly visionary company can never be satisfied under any conditions, even if the company succeeds enormously: "We can always do better; we can always go further; we can always find new possibilities." As Henry Ford said, "You have got to keep doing and going."


An Internal Drive:
Like core ideology, the drive for progress is an internal force. The drive for progress doesn't wait for the external world to say, "It's time to change" or "It's time to improve" or "It's time to invent something new". No, like the drive inside a great artist or prolific inventor, it is simply there, pushing outward and onward.


In visionary company, the drive to go further, to do better, to create new possibilities needs no external justifications.


We've found that organizations often have great intentions and inspiring visions for themselves, but they don't take the crucial step of translating their intentions into concrete items. Even worse, they often tolerate organization characteristics, strategies, and tactics that are misaligned with their admirable intentions, which creates confusion and cynicism. The gears and mechanisms of the ticking clock don't grind against each other but rather work in concert - in alignment with each other - to preserve the core and stimulate progress. The builders of the visionary companies seek alignments in strategies, in tactics, in organization systems, in structure, in incentive systems, in building layouts, in job design - in everything.

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Built to Last (4): More Than Profits


Had read "Built to Last" since a while; and realized that it's not just about building a company that would last for couple decades, but also it's about building a "Personality" & a "Nation" that could last for decades as well.

So, I thought I should keep some notes/excerpts...

Part 1: The Best of The Best
Part 2: Clock Building, Not Time Telling
Part 3: No "Tyranny of The OR" (Embrace The "Genius of The AND")
------------------------
"We distinguish between core values and practices; the core values don't change, but the practices might." - John Young, Former CEO, Hewlett-Packard, 1992
  • Our research show that a fundamental element in the "ticking clock" of a visionary company is a core ideology - core values and sense of purpose beyond just making money - that guides and inspires people throughout the organization and remains relatively fixed for long periods of time.
  • Profitability is a necessary condition for existence and a means to more important ends, but it is not the end in itself for many of the visionary companies. Profit is like oxygen, food, water, and blood for the body; they are not the point of life, but without them, there is no life.
  • We did not find any specific ideological content essential to being a visionary company. Our research indicates that the authenticity of the ideology and the extent to which a company attains consistent alignment with the ideology counts more than the content of the ideology. 
  •  A key step in building a visionary company is to articulate a core ideology. Drawing upon what we saw in the visionary companies, we've created a practical two-part definition of core ideology. 
Core Ideology = Core Values + Purpose
Core Values = The organization's essential and enduring tenets - a small set of general guiding principals; not to be confused with specific culture or operating practising; not to be compromised for financial gain or short-term expediency.

Purpose = The organization's fundamental reason for existence beyond just making money - a perpetual guiding star on the horizon; not to be confused with specific goals or business strategies. 
  • Not all of the visionary companies began life with a well-articulated core ideology. So, if you haven't yet articulate a core ideology because you've been in the throes of launching a company, that's okay. But the earlier, the better.  

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Built to Last (3): No "Tyranny of The OR" (Embrace The "Genius of The AND")


Had read "Built to Last" since a while; and realized that it's not just about building a company that would last for couple decades, but also it's about building a "Personality" & a "Nation" that could last for decades as well.

So, I thought I should keep some notes/excerpts

Part 1: The Best of The Best
Part 2: Clock Building, Not Time Telling

------------------------
The Yin\Yang symbol from the
Chinese philosophy representing
the embrace of two opposed
ideas at the same time
Here's a key aspect of highly visionary companies: They do not oppress themselves with what we call the "Tyranny of the the OR" - the rational view that cannot easily accept paradox, that cannot live with two seemingly contradictory forces or ideas at the same time. The "Tyranny of the the OR" pushes people to believe that things must be either A OR B, but not both. It makes such proclamations as:
  • "You can have change OR stability."
  • "You can have low cost OR high quality."
  • "You can invest for the future OR do well in the short-term."
Irrational? Perhaps. Rare? Yes. Difficult? Absolutely. But as F. Scott Fitzgerald pointed out, "The rest of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function," This is exactly what the visionary companies are able to do.

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Personal Note:
Since Jan 25th (and even before it long time ago), we - the Egyptians - has been always convinced that we have to follow the "Tyranny of the the OR" idea. "You can have Mubark OR total chaos.", "You can have the military state OR the Muslims Brotherhood.", "You can have Morsi OR Shafiq." etc...

It's pretty much clear that it doesn't work at all!

The same on the personal level, I can list a lot of ideas that a person can think off with the "Tyranny of the the OR" theory, while they could be embraced by the "Genius of The AND", and the results are really too great!

Monday, September 16, 2013

Changing Photoshop CS6 UI Into English


I had just installed Photoshop CS6, and I found its in a language that I don't know (Dutch I guess, maybe!).

Photoshop CS6 in a language that I'm not familiar with! (Click to enlarge)

This can be fixed in two simple steps:
  1. Navigate through Photoshop installation, till you reach a file named "tw10428.dat".
    • The main installation folder most probably be found in: "C:\Program Files (x86)\Adobe\Adobe Photoshop CS6".
    • The navigate to: "...\Locales\da_DK\Support Files".
    • The "tw10428.dat" is located in the "Supported Files" folder. 

      Navigate till you find "tw10428.dat" file. (Click to enlarge)
  2. Now change the extension of the "tw10428.dat" into anything else. Foe instance, rename it to "tw10428.dam".
Change the file extension. (Click to enlarge)

That's it! Just restart Photoshop (close it, then start it again), and it will be in English.

All in English now :). (Click to enlarge)

References:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nihpsm17lOc 
 

Monday, May 6, 2013

Built to Last (2): Clock Building, Not Time Telling


Had started reading "Built to Last" since a while; and realized that it's not just about building a company that would last for couple decades, but also it's about building a "Personality" & a "Nation" that could last for decades as well.

So, I thought I should keep some notes/excerpts

Part 1: The Best of The Best

------------------------

Imagine you met a remarkable person who could look at the sun or stars at any time of day or night and state the exact time and date: "it's April 23, 1401, 2:36 AM, and 12 seconds." This person would be an amazing time teller, and we'd probably revere that person for the ability to tell time. But wouldn't that person be even more amazing if, instead of telling time, he or she built a clock that could tell the time forever, even after he or she was dead and gone?

Having a great idea or being a charismatic visionary leader is "time telling"; building a company that can prosper for beyond the presence of any single leader and through multiple product life cycles is "clock building".

The primary output of visionary companies builders efforts is not the tangible implementation of great idea, the expression of a charismatic personality, the gratification of their ego, or the accumulation of personal wealth. Their greatest creation is the company itself and what it stands for.

Waiting for "The Great Idea" Might Be a Bad Idea:
If you are a prospective entrepreneur with the desire to start and build a visionary company but have not yet taken the plunge because you don't have a "great idea," we encourage you to lift from your shoulders the burden of the great-idea myth. Indeed, the evidence suggests that it might be better to not obsess on finding a great idea before launching a company. Why? Because the great-idea approach shifts your attention away from seeing the company as your ultimate creation.

The Company Itself is The Ultimate Creation:
 We had to shift from seeing the company as a vehicle for the product to seeing the products as a vehicle to the company. We had to embrace the crucial difference between time and telling and clock building.

The builders of visionary companies were highly persistent, living to the motto: Never, never, never give up.But what to persist with? Their answer: The company. Be prepared to kill, revise, or evolve an idea, but never give up on the company.

If you're involved in building and managing a company, the shift to seeing the company as the ultimate creation, has significant implications for how you spend your time. It means spending less time thinking about a specific product lines and market strategies, and spending more of your time thinking about organization design. It means spending less of your time being time teller, and spending more of your time being a clock builder.

The continual stream of great products and services from highly visionary companies stems from them being outstanding organizations, not the other way around

The Message For CEOs, Managers, and Entrepreneurs:
 One of the most important steps you can take in building a visionary company is not an action, but a shift in prospective. We're asking you to think less in terms of being a brilliant product visionary or seeking the personality characteristics of charismatic leadership, and to think more in terms of being an organizational visionary and building the characteristics of visionary company.

You don't have to sit around waiting until you're lucky enough to have a great idea. You don't have to accept the false view that until your company has a charismatic visionary leader, it cannot be a visionary company. There is no mysterious quality or elusive magic. Indeed, once you learn the essentials, you -and all those around you- can just get down to the hard work of making your company a visionary company.

No "Tyranny Of The OR" (Embrace The "Genius of The "AND"):
Visionary companies do not oppress themselves with what we call the "Tyranny of the OR" - the rational view that cannot easily accept paradox, that cannot live with two seemingly contradictory forces or ideas at the same time. The "Tyranny of the OR" pushes people to believe that things must be either A OR B, but not both. It makes such proclamations as:
  • "You can have change OR stability."
  • " You can be conservative OR Bold."
  • "You can have low cost OR high quality."
A visionary company doesn't seek balance between short-term and long-term. It seeks to do very well in the short-term and very well in the long-term. 



Sunday, May 5, 2013

Build to Last: The Best of The Best


Had started reading "Built to Last" since a while; and realized that it's not just about building a company that would last for couple decades, but also it's about building a "Personality" & a "Nation" that could last for decades as well.

So, I thought I should keep some notes/excerpts
------------------------

What is a visionary company? Visionary companies are premier institutions - the crown jewels - in their industries, widely admired by their peers and having a long track record of making a significant impact on the world around us. The key point is that a visionary company is an organization -an institution. All individual leaders, no matter how charismatic or visionary, eventually die; and all visionary products and services - all "great ideas"- eventually become obsolete.

12 Shattered Myths:
  • Myth 1: It takes a great idea to start a great company.
    Reality: Visionary companies often get off to a slow start, but with the long race.
  • Myth 2: Visionary companies require great and charismatic visionary leaders.
    Reality: They sought to be clock builders, not time tellers.
  • Myth 3: The most successful companies exist first and foremost to maximize profits.
    Reality: Visionary companies pursue a cluster of objectives, of which making money is only one -and not necessarily the primary one. Yes, they seek profits, but they're equally guided by a core ideology -core values and sense of purpose beyond just making money.
  • Myth 4: Visionary companies share a common subset of "correct" core values.
    Reality: The crucial variable is not the content of a company's ideology, but how deeply it believes its ideology and how consistently it lives, breathes, and expresses it in all that it does. Visionary companies do not ask, "What should we value?" They ask, "What do we actually value deep down to our toes?".
  • Myth 5: The only constant is change.
    Reality: a visionary company almost religiously preserves its core ideology -changing it seldom, if ever. Yet, while keeping their core ideologues tightly fixed, visionary companies display a powerful drive for progress that enables them to change and adopt without compromising their cherished core ideals.
  • Myth 6: Blue-chip companies play it safe.
    Reality: Visionary companies have judiciously used BHAGs (Big Hairy Audacious Goals) to stimulate progress and blast the comparison companies at crucial points in history.
  • Myth 7: Visionary companies are great places to work, for everyone.
    Reality: Only those who "fit" extremely well with the core ideology and demanding standards of a visionary company will find it a great place to work.
  • Myth 8:  Highly successful companies make their best moves by brilliant and complex strategic planning.
    Reality: Visionary companies make some of their best moves by experimentation, trial and error, opportunism, and -quite literally- accident.
  • Myth 9: Companies should hire outside CEOs to stimulate fundamental change.
    Reality: Home-grown management rules at the visionary companies to a far greater degree than at the comparison companies (by a factor of six). Time and again, they have dashed to bits the conventional wisdom that significant change and fresh ideas cannot come from inside.
  • Myth 10: The most successful companies focus primarily on beating the competition.
    Reality: Visionary companies focus primary on beating themselves. Success and beating competitors comes to the visionary companies not so much as the end goal, but as a residual result of relentlessly asking the question "How can we improve ourselves to do better tomorrow than we did today?". They never think they've done "good enough".
  • Myth 11: You can't have your cake and eat it too.
    Reality: Visionary companies embrace the "Genius of AND" - the paradoxical view that allows them to pursue both A AND B at the same time.
  • Myth 12: Companies become visionary primary through "vision statement".
    Reality: Creating a statement can be a helpful step in building a visionary company, but it is only one of thousands of steps in a never-ending process of expressing the fundamental characteristic we identified across the visionary companies.

Monday, January 21, 2013

Saturday, January 12, 2013

Maping a Domain Name to a Hosting Account


Two most essential things that you need to get started with your own website are a valid domain name and a web hosting account.

Domain name with .com, .net, .org or other such extensions (technically known as TLDs) can be booked with domain registrars like GoDaddy.com and Limedomains.com.

Hosting space for your website can be booked either through the same provider, or an altogether different company.

Once you have purchased both (a valid domain name and a web hosting account.), you will need to configure your domain name details, so that it points to the hosting space that you booked for your website. All of this may sound complicated so far, but the steps given below will allow you to map your domain name very easily:

Step 1: Define the Name Server details for your host with domain registrar

Your domain registrar will identify the path of your website host through the name servers. Details of the name servers are usually sent by the web hosting provider through an email, after you purchase the web hosting account.

A typical name server would look like NS1.<hosting provider site name>.com and NS2.<hosting provider site name>.com. For example, for Fatcow.com, which is a popular web hosting provider the name servers are NS1.fatcow.com and NS2.fatcow.com. You must copy these details and keep them ready for the next step.

Step 2: Update the Name Server Details through Domain Manager

Domain manager is a secure page, provided by your domain registrar, to access and configure domains purchased by you through them. You will need to login to the domain manager page by using the credentials you receive during domain registration.

You will see your domain name listed, on the main page of domain manager. The page that opens when you click your domain name, will show you details such as Administrative and Technical contacts for the domain as updated on the global WhoIs Database.

You will also find two fields pertaining to the Name Server. You will need to update this with the Name Server details of your host that you noted in step 1. When you save it, Domain Name Servers around the world will start updating themselves with the new destination of the domain. Although this process is quite fast, a safe time estimate stated by the domain registrar is 24 hours.

While this is happening, you can immediately go back to your host and complete the domain mapping process.

Step 3: Configure the domain through Hosting Control Panel

You will need to login to the control panel of your website host through the login details provided during hosting registration. In the control panel, you will see a link to Domain Manager or Domain Central. When you click on this, you will need to further select “Add new domain”. When you do this, you will be prompted for the Domain Name that you wish to map to the hosting account, and a folder path on your host that will serve as the root folder for your domain name.

Once you have entered the details, upload the contents of your website in the configured folder. You will find your website go live very shortly.

Note that in some cases it may take up to 24 hours for Domain Name Servers around the world to update the name of your website. So, be patient.

Reference:
http://www.serverschool.com/server-configuration/how-to-map-a-domain-name-to-a-hosting-account/